Essentia Health Walk-in Care-Bismarck 9th Street welcomes Specialist Teresa Formo

Essentia Health Walk-in Care-Bismarck 9th Street welcomes Specialist Teresa Formo
Essentia Health Walk-in Care-Bismarck 9th Street welcomes Specialist Teresa Formo

Like Nowhere Else: The Austin Story – Essentia Health Video Transcript

(DESCRIPTION)
A hockey player hits a puck. A woman stands in front of an outdoor ice hockey rink.

(SPEECH)
CHRISTINA BERGLUND: My name is Christina Berglund and I am Austin’s mom.

(DESCRIPTION)
Two hockey players, players 9 and 39, slide on the ice wearing blue, yellow and white outfits. Christina is now sitting in the infield stands wearing a hat that says Esco and has a round pin with Austin’s picture on it.

(SPEECH)
Austin is nine years old. This is his first year playing hockey. He loves all sports.

(DESCRIPTION)
Player 9 dribbles the puck.

(SPEECH)
And it was a fun and exciting winter. AUSTIN BERGLUND: Teammate, you’ve got to get back to your net. CHRISTINA BERGLUND: Austin was born without the lower part of his right arm.

(DESCRIPTION)
Austin sits on a bench in his hockey gear and his mom snaps a hockey prosthesis onto his arm.

(SPEECH)
When we first started this season, Austin had a body powered prosthetic with a hockey stick attached to the end of it. But it was too tight on the pole. And for his age and abilities, he couldn’t get the rod in and out of her, move her, or really control her.

(DESCRIPTION)
Player 9 hits the puck while Player 39 sits on the ice.

(SPEECH)
Then we switched to just his regular attachment and it didn’t give him any power or control with the stick. And because of that he had started tucking the hockey stick under his arm. And we were worried that if he fell or fell, the pole would hit his armpit or hurt him.

(DESCRIPTION)
Player 9 hits the puck into the net.

(SPEECH)
A few of the fathers of hockey were talking one night when they were icing the rink. And one of the dads happened to say, well, this is what I actually do for a living. And that’s how we met Joe.

(DESCRIPTION)
Text, Joseph Vanderbosch. Operations Manager for Orthopedics and Prosthetics. Joseph is sitting in a medical office.

(SPEECH)
JOSEPH VANDERBOSCH: We noticed that he needed more elbow range of motion, right, than what he had. So we try to change the nest design a bit by grabbing different areas. So the old outlet he had is self-hanging. So it would go in there and then it would hold, being tight right over those condyles. But what that does is it greatly limits the range of motion in your elbow and also prevents you from pronating and supinating, right.

(DESCRIPTION)
He twists his wrist left and right.

(SPEECH)
So we threw a wrap over it with a little locking mechanism that has a little pin on the liner so it can lock and hang that way.

(DESCRIPTION)
Austin quickly twirls his new prosthetic and hockey stick back and forth.

(SPEECH)
So we can kind of free up the range of motion in the elbow so that he gets a lot more elbow range. And we were able to get it tight enough where we were picking up some pronation and supination. So he gets on that top arm, right, when you handle the club you have to use the shoulder, internal and external rotation, and then also some pronation, supination. So I think that helped too.

(DESCRIPTION)
In a time-lapse video, they assemble the prosthesis in a workshop.

(SPEECH)
I wanted to turn him in for his hockey practice two days later in the evening at Carlton. I think it was the next day, I couldn’t sleep. I got up around 4:00. I’m like, I’m going in, I’ve got to start working on this thing. CHRISTINA BERGLUND: I think one of my favorite things about Joe is that he seems just as excited to make this prosthetic for Austin as we are. Before you know it, he actually met us at the rink one night with the real arm and tried it on, put it right there and went out on the ice with it. It’s just that the whole process was extremely fast and exciting and definitely had a huge impact on Austin’s first season of hockey.

(DESCRIPTION)
Austin dribbles the puck.

(SPEECH)
The very first day he got on the ice, it was really cute to watch because he was spinning his prosthetic behind his back and lifting the stick over his head, doing things he hadn’t been able to do before. AUSTIN BERGLUND: Mom, we’re going to play cops and robbers. CHRISTINA BERGLUND: He’s amazing. I learned very quickly not to think that Austin couldn’t do something. You can’t say no to this boy.

(DESCRIPTION)
Austin dribbles the puck and player 39 approaches.

(SPEECH)
I’m excited to see what the future holds for us working with Essentia and what other amazing tools we can create for Austin for other things in his life to help him fulfill or achieve or pursue more of his dreams that he can they have

(DESCRIPTION)
The two hockey players leave the building and walk down a snowy path marked by tall orange cones. Texting care like nowhere else SM. Essentia Health. The Essentia Health logo appears, consisting of three leaves in a circle.

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